Why Giving Tuesday Raises An Uncomfortable ethical quandary

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About Giving
Giving may refer to:

Gift, the transfer of something without the expectation of receiving something in return
Generosity, the habit of giving freely without expecting anything in return
Charity (practice), the giving of help to those in need who are not related to the giver
Giving: How Each of Us Can Change the World, a book by Bill Clinton
Giving (album), an album by Colm Ó Snodaigh

Why Giving Tuesday Raises An Uncomfortable Moral Dilemma

About Tuesday
Tuesday is the day of the week between Monday and Wednesday. According to international standard ISO 8601, Monday is the first day of the week and so Tuesday is the second day of the week. According to some commonly used calendars, however, especially in the United States, Sunday is the first day of the week and so Tuesday is the third day of the week. The English name is derived from Old English Tiwesdæg and Middle English Tewesday, meaning “Tīw’s Day”, the day of Tiw or Týr, the god of single combat, and law and justice in Norse mythology. Tiw was equated with Mars in the interpretatio germanica, and the name of the day is a translation of Latin dies Martis.

Why Giving Tuesday Raises An Uncomfortable Moral Dilemma