Derby will demand £4m compensation charge from Chelsea for Frank Lampard

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In an interview with The Daily Telegraph before the play-off final, Morris admitted it was inevitable Lampard would eventually manage Chelsea.

He said: “I think it is just one of those things, because of the legend he was there as a player. The longer he is here at Derby with success, the easier it is to go there without risk to him because Chelsea is a big club with massive expectations.

About demand
Demand is the quantity of a good that consumers are willing and able to purchase at various prices during a given period of time.The relationship between price and quantity demanded is also known as the demand curve. Preferences which underlie demand, are influenced by cost, benefit, odds and other variables.
Innumerable factors and circumstances affect a buyer’s willingness or ability to buy a good. Some of the common factors are:

Good’s own price: The basic demand relationship is between potential prices of a good and the quantities that would be purchased at those prices. Generally the relationship is negative meaning that an increase in price will induce a decrease in the quantity demanded. This negative relationship is embodied in the downward slope of the consumer demand curve. The assumption of a negative relationship is reasonable and intuitive. For example, if the price of a gallon of milk rose from $5 to a price of $15, this is a big price increase. This significant price increase causes the consumer to demand less of that product at the price of $15 because not only is it more expensive, but the new price is very unreasonable for a gallon of milk.
Price of related goods: The principal related goods are complements and substitutes. A complement is a good that is used with the primary good. Examples include hotdogs and mustard, beer and pretzels, automobiles and gasoline. (Perfect complements behave as a single good.) If the price of the complement goes up the quantity demanded of the other good goes down.Mathematically, the variable representing the price of the complementary good would have a negative coefficient in the demand function. For example, Qd = a – P – Pg where Q is the quantity of automobiles demanded, P is the price of automobiles and Pg is the price of gasoline. The other main category of related goods are substitutes. Substitutes are goods that can be used in place of the primary good. The mathematical relationship between the price of the substitute and the demand for the good in question is positive. If the price of the substitute goes down the demand for the good in question goes down.
Personal Disposable Income: In most cases, the more disposable income (income after tax and receipt of benefits) a person has, the more likely that person is to buy.
Tastes or preferences: The greater the desire to own a good the more likely one is to buy the good. There is a basic distinction between desire and demand. Desire is a measure of the willingness to buy a good based on its intrinsic qualities. Demand is the willingness and ability to put one’s desires into effect. It is assumed that tastes and preferences are relatively constant.
Consumer expectations about future prices, income and availability: If a consumer believes that the price of the good will be higher in the future, he/she is more likely to purchase the good now. If the consumer expects that his/her income will be higher in the future, the consumer may buy the good now. Availability (supply side) as well as predicted or expected availability also affects both price and demand.
Population: If the population grows this means that demand will also increase.
Nature of the good: If the good is a basic commodity, it will lead to a higher demandThis list is not exhaustive. All facts and circumstances that a buyer finds relevant to his willingness or ability to buy goods can affect demand. For example, a person caught in an unexpected storm is more likely to buy an umbrella than if the weather were bright and sunny.

Derby will demand £4m compensation fee from Chelsea for Frank Lampard

About compensation
Compensation may refer to:

Financial compensation
Compensation (chess), various advantages a player has in exchange for a disadvantage
Compensation (engineering)
Compensation (essay), by Ralph Waldo Emerson
Compensation (film), a 2000 film
Compensation (psychology)
Biological compensation, the characteristic pattern of bending of the plant or mushroom stem after turning from the normal vertical position

“I would always be pleased we gave him the opportunity, proud of what he has achieved with us, and if that happened sooner rather than later I would just hope it works out for him. There would be absolutely no ill feeling and we’d understand it’s probably an opportunity he couldn’t turn down.”

Derby will demand £4m compensation fee from Chelsea for Frank Lampard